The Biggest Tech Fails of the Last Decade

Any organization, be it a multi-billion-dollar corporate behemoth or lowly startup, can launch a hyped product that turns out to be total dud. We’ve seen our fair share of tech flops (this is the second time we round up products for a similar list), and while some very quickly

In no particular order of uselessness, here are our top ten biggest tech fails of the last ten years.

 

What’s more dangerous than an exploding phone? How about a toy aimed at kids that spontaneously catches fire? Not content with the risk of breaking limbs and maneuvering into traffic, several hoverboards came with an extra element of danger that could turn users into a non-superhero version of the Human Torch.

 

Not all the hoverboards were prone to bursting into flames; it was mainly the cheaply made knockoffs—of which there were a lot. But even some of the bigger name brands found themselves banned from retailers such as Target and Amazon over safety concerns.

 

Not all the hoverboards were prone to bursting into flames; it was mainly the cheaply made knockoffs—of which there were a lot. But even some of the bigger name brands found themselves banned from retailers such as Target and Amazon over safety concerns.

The final straw came when the United States Postal Service followed the lead of a number of airlines, including Delta, United, and American Airlines, by banning the devices from air transportation. Remember: if a toy has the potential to bring down a plane, it should only be given as a Xmas gift to people you really don’t like.

 

Like a shambling zombie from the Walking Dead, Microsoft’s Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile initiative managed to hang around for years before 2017 saw it take the figurative bullet to the head.

 

Not everyone disliked Windows Phones, and some of the Lumia handsets weren’t all that bad, but even though the concept of the Windows Mobile platform sounded good, it struggled to drag users away from Android and iOS. Little support from app developers and a lack of features you would expect to see in a smartphone ensured that the mobile market was one industry Microsoft wasn’t going to dominate.

 

In July, three years after version 8.1 shipped to users, Microsoft dropped support for the Windows phone. But at least Windows 10 Mobile was still alive—up until the start of October, that is, when a Microsoft exec said it was no longer a focus for the company.

 

In July, three years after version 8.1 shipped to users, Microsoft dropped support for the Windows phone. But at least Windows 10 Mobile was still alive—up until the start of October, that is, when a Microsoft exec said it was no longer a focus for the company.

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