How to Fix a Computer

I got a kick out of this infographic.  Believe it or not turning your computer off and then back on can help many problems.  Another quick fix can be unplugging the device and plugging it back in 30 seconds later.  This works particularly well with network equipment such as routers, dsl boxes, etc.

Find other useful computer repair tips and information on Windows 10 Tips check out the rest of our bog.

How Hackers Exploit You

How Hackers Exploit You
This excellent infographic is brought to you by the great folks at Cleburne PC Repair.  If you need a computer repair in Burleson, TX or the surrounding areas give us a call at (254) 479-8006.  We can help you with your computer repair in Cleburne, Alvarado, Joshua, Godley, Mansfield, and Rio Vista also.
From Visually.

Top Windows 10 Shortcuts

We found this list of Windows 10 shortcuts that we wanted to share with our customers.  At Cleburne PC Repair we offer computer repair in Cleburne, TX and across Johnson County. Call us at (254) 479-8006 for help with your next computer repair in Burleson, Alvarado, Rio Vista, Mansfield, Joshua, and Godley.

Windows 10 introduced some new shortcuts to take full advantage of the operating system’s features and interface. Here are some of the highlights:

Windows 10 Shortcuts

Windows 10 Shortcuts

Improved window management

Snap a window left / right: Windows key + Arrow key left / right
Snap a window to a quadrant: Windows key + Up or Down (after moving left or right)

Create new virtual desktop: Windows key + Ctrl + D
Close current virtual desktop: Windows key + Ctrl + F4
Cycle through desktops to the left / right: Windows key + Ctrl + Left / Right
Minimize all windows in the background except active window: Windows key + Home
Open Task View interface (to see all the virtual desktops you have running): Windows key + Tab


More Windows 10 shortcuts

Open Windows 10 Action Center: Windows key + A
Open Windows Settings: Windows key + I
Open Taskbar program (1, 2, 3…): Windows key + Number (“1” opens the first program pinned in the taskbar, and so on).
Open Start button context menu: Windows key + X

Open the Game DVR recorder: Windows key + G
Start recording current activity on screen: Windows key + Alt + G
Stop recording: Windows key + Alt + R
Open Cortana for voice input: Windows key + Q
Open Cortana for text input: Windows key + S

Take a Screenshot

Take a screenshot and save it to the Pictures folder: Windows key + PrtSc
Grab screenshot of the whole screen and save it to the clipboard: PrtSc
Grab screenshot of the current window and save it to the clipboard: Alt + PrtSc
Optional For more advanced functionality, Windows 10 comes with a built-in utility called Snipping Tool. You can also use a third party app like Monosnap.

New Windows 10 Command Prompt Shortcuts

Highlight text to the left of cursor: Shift + Left
Highlight text to the right of cursor: Shift + Right
Copy selected text to clipboard: Ctrl + C
Paste text from clipboard into command prompt: Ctrl + V
Select all text after prompt: Ctrl + A

Old but Good Windows Shortcuts

Open the Task Manager: Ctrl + Shift + Esc
Open the Run dialog box: Windows key + R
Minimize all windows: Windows key + M
Restore minimized windows on the desktop: Windows key + Shift + M
Maximize window: Windows key + Up arrow
Minimize window: Windows key + Down arrow
Zoom in or out using Magnifier: Windows key + Plus sign (+) / Minus sign (-)
Close the active window, or exit the active app: Alt + F4
Display properties for the selected item: Alt + Enter
Switch to recent window: Alt + Tab
Rename the selected item: F2
Search for a file or folder: F3
Display the address bar list in the File Explorer: F4
Refresh the active window: F5
Activate the menu bar in the active window: F10
Lock your PC: Windows key + L

This list found at: http://www.techspot.com/guides/1145-software-shortcuts/

Forced Microsoft Windows 10 Upgrade Explained – Why?

This is an excellent youtube video describing the forced Windows 10 upgrade and the sneaky tactics Microsoft is using to push there new operating system. If you need help with this situation or any other type of computer repair in Cleburne, TX and the surrounding areas give us a call. (254) 479-8006.

40 Incredibly Useful Computer Tips & Keyboard Shortcuts

Expect to see shortcut keys like Ctrl + Alt + Del and Alt + F4? Nah. This is a list of no common sense and little-known computer tips you will actually use.
Google Chrome

1. To open Chrome’s built-in task manager: Press Shift + Esc. Extremely useful when Chrome freezes.

2. To remove specific suggestion: Select the suggestion, then press Shift + Delete. Go and delete your how to shave my embarrassing searches now.

3. To drag multiple tabs to a new window: Press Ctrl + Click on tabs you want to move. Do the same to move multiple tabs to an existing window.

Any Browsers

5. To access your address bar directly: Press F6 or Ctrl + L.

6. To access blocked web page: Go to Google Translate, paste the URL, select source language as other language, select destination language as the web page’s language, click Translate. Free web proxy.

7. To close a tab: Middle click on it.

8. To view articles with slideshows or multiple pages: Press Print or Ctrl + P.

9. To open all web pages of a bookmark folder: Middle click on the folder.

10. To reset to the default Window size of your web page after zooming: Press Ctrl + 0.

11. To highlight text in a web page:  Click on the starting point, then press Shift + Click on the ending point. No more mouse dragging especially long text highlights.

12. To fit more bookmarks: Remove all text. Only the favicon is visible now.

13. You can undo send your mail in Gmail. Turn it on now just in case!

14. When researching products, type [product name] vs to compare with their rival products.
Windows

15. To open Task Manager directly with one hand: Press Ctrl + Shift + Esc. You’re welcome.

16. To minimize every open windows except yours: Shake your active window. Do the same to maximize all windows. You sneaky Microsoft.

17. To freeze Task Manager: Hold Ctrl key. Useful for inspecting specific processes.

18. To capture the exact steps you take and document it nicely: Search psr to open Problem Steps Recorder. Try it now and you’ll be amazed.

19. To take a screenshot of the active window only: Press Alt + Print Screen. Bye Snipping Tool.

20. To delete one word at a time: Press Ctrl + Backspace.

21. To open applications on the taskbar: Press Windows key + Sequence number of the application. Do the same to minimize/maximize it.

22. To paste text without formatting: Press Ctrl + Shift + V.

23. To rename a file: Press F2. Works for multiple file too, which will append “(1), (2), etc.” at the end.

24. Open your Calculator and select View. Calculate your mortgage payment, fuel economy, vehicle lease payment, and more.

Read the full story: http://carlcheo.com/computer-tips-and-tricks

Windows 10 tip: Stay organized using virtual desktops

Windows 10 Virtual Desktops

You no longer need third-party software to use virtual desktops, now that this feature is included in Windows 10 as part of Task View. Here’s how to create extra desktops and move open apps and windows between them as well as other tips for Windows 10 also.

Virtual desktops are nothing new for Windows, but earlier versions required third-party software (such as the free Sysinternals Desktops utility).

In Windows 10, this feature is built in, as part of Task View. You can have multiple virtual desktops, organizing open apps into different desktops to minimize clutter and distraction.

To create a new, empty virtual desktop, click the taskbar’s Task View button (just to the right of search) or use the keyboard shortcut Windows key + Tab, and then click New Desktop.

Each virtual desktop is numbered. To see which apps and open windows are associated with a given desktop, let the mouse pointer hover over the thumbnail of that desktop. To move an app from one desktop to another, just drag the app from the rows of thumbnail in Task View and drop it on the desktop you want to use.

To close a virtual desktop, click the X in the upper right corner of its thumbnail in Task View.

You can use Task View to switch virtual desktops, but it’s faster to move between them using the keyboard shortcut: Windows key + Ctrl + right arrow/left arrow.

Today’s tip brought to you by: http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-tip-stay-organized-using-virtual-desktops/

Microsoft Makes Final, Aggressive Windows 10 Upgrade Push

Microsoft has launched the final push in its nine-and-a-half-month upgrade offensive against consumers and businesses running Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

Last week, Microsoft switched the automatically-offered Windows 10 upgrade to a “Recommended” download that in turn scheduled the upgrade process unless the user interfered.
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“As we shared in October, Windows 10 will be offered as a ‘Recommended’ update for Windows 7 and 8.1 customers whose Windows Update settings are configured to accept ‘Recommended’ updates,” a Microsoft spokesman said Friday in an email reply to questions.

Those questions were spurred by reports from Computerworld readers, who said that they’d again been offered an upgrade after months of either ignoring the campaign or dodging the transmutation of their PCs from Windows 7 or 8.1 to 10.

In February, Microsoft kicked off the “Recommended” phase of its long-stated strategy to convince, coax and pester users into upgrading to Windows 10. At the time, the Redmond, Wash. company confirmed that it had begun pre-selecting the upgrade as a Recommended update delivered through the Windows Update service. But it also said that the shift to Recommended would “roll out in a phased approach,” signaling that the migration would take weeks or months.

In Windows Update, a Recommended update is one that is automatically downloaded and installed — no user assistance required — on PCs whose owners have not changed the default behavior of the service.

Microsoft originally announced in October 2015 that it planned to use Windows Update, the operating system’s default security maintenance service, to automatically send the upgrade to PCs.

Also last week, Microsoft expanded a long-existing support document that details what users see when the Get Windows 10 (GSX) app — which Microsoft planted on millions of PCs last spring and has refreshed and reinstalled many times since on those systems — schedules the upgrade and how people can cancel the process before it starts.

That scheduling is not new — a search provider cache of that page still available on Friday showed it had been part of the push since at least March — but the revised document was more detailed as well as more forthcoming about how the upgrade is triggered.

According to both the latest and the previous versions of the support document, the upgrade and its scheduled implementation is approved when the user either clicks the “OK” button or the “X” in the upper right corner of the notification.

“If you click on OK or on the red ‘X’, you’re all set for the upgrade and there is nothing further to do,” the document stated. The “X” Microsoft mentioned is one way to close a window in Windows.

But Microsoft’s interpretation of clicking the X is contrary to decades of practice in windowed user interfaces (UIs) and normal user expectations: To users, shutting a window by clicking the X tells the OS to remove the notification or application frame without expressing an opinion, selecting an option or calling up an operation.

Instead, Microsoft equates closing the window with approving the scheduled upgrade.

Microsoft has applied some unusual stratagems in its efforts to get customers to upgrade to Windows 10, but this behavior is among its most aggressive simply because it is deceptive in the context of normal Windows UI behavior.

In fact, it’s very likely that many of the accounts — and they have been widespread — that the proffered Windows 10 upgrade began without user approval can be traced to this strange interpretation by Microsoft. Thinking that by clicking the X they were rejecting the notification, or at least ignoring it, users instead were actually authorizing the upgrade.

When the upgrade began later, they professed they had not approved it, not remembering an explicit affirmation, when in reality they had — under Microsoft’s rules — given the green light.

This story is from: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3070460/windows-pcs/microsoft-makes-final-aggressive-windows-10-upgrade-push.html

Top 10 computer mistakes beginners make

Below we’ve listed the top 10 mistakes we find beginner computer users making and how you can avoid falling into the same mistakes.  These are definitely some great computer tips for beginners.  One tip that I would like to add is to avoid Windows 10 if you are a new user and not tech savvy.

1. Not backing up important files

One of the biggest mistakes anyone can make is not backing up important information. Today, there are so many different methods of backing up your information that there is no longer any excuse for not backing up your information. Make sure to backup all important information before it is too late.

2. Clicking Next or Ok without reading

Everyone has become more impatient thanks to the instant gratification we all enjoy every day on the Internet. However, because of this impatience it is not uncommon for new users to click Ok or Next without reading what they are agreeing to and not making sure there are no check boxes still checked. Make sure you read every prompt before agreeing, or you may be agreeing to install new browser toolbars, a program you didn’t intend to install, or other crapware.

3. Not saving work

While working on a document either offline or online make sure that the program is automatically saving your work. If a program does not automatically save your work, you need to make sure you are saving your work every 10-15 minutes. If the computer loses power, Internet connection, or the program crashes everything is lost that hasn’t been saved.
Turning off the computer improperly

With more users learning on Smartphones and Tablets before learning the computer, not all new users are familiar with the proper method to shut down (turn off) a computer. When you are done with a computer and want to turn it off make sure to save any work, close open programs, and shut down the computer properly.

4. Opening e-mail attachments

A common method of getting infected with a computer virus or malware is from opening e-mail attachments. Be extremely cautious and doubtful on all e-mail attachments you receive including any e-mail attachments you receive from friends, family, and co-workers. One of the most common tactics malicious users use to send viruses is from people you know to gain a false sense of trust.

5. Phishing

As computers become more secure, and users get more tech savvy, many malicious individuals have moved to attacking people using phishing tactics. Make sure you are aware of how phishing works and how you can make sure you do not become a victim of identity theft.

6. Spam

Almost all spam today is distributed by infected computers or malicious users. Replying to these spam messages will not unsubscribe you from any list and usually is never looked at or received. In some cases, a spammer may even use your reply as a verification that an e-mail works and send you more spam or share your e-mail address with other spammers. If you get spam, just delete it from your inbox.

7. Chain mail

You should also never forward your friends and family chain mail. If you find an e-mail hard to believe, make sure it is true before you forward the myth or rumor to anyone else.

8. Downloading and installing bad software

Today, the most common ways a computer gets infected with viruses, malware, and other crapware is from downloading and installing bad software on the computer. Always be cautious of free software and who is providing you with the free software. To subsidize costs many developers include other bundled programs or toolbars, and if you are not careful, you may install them during the install. As mentioned earlier, always be sure to read what the program is doing during the install.

Unfortunately, reading is also not always enough and sites offering free things like cursors, fonts, wallpaper, emotions, and other small downloads may be bundled with other bad software. When downloading anything, keep the below suggestions in mind.

Where are you getting the download?

There are malicious people who download valid copies of a popular download, modify the file with malicious software, and then upload the file with the same name. Make sure you are downloading from the developer’s web page or a reputable company.

Don’t install download manager

Many sites suggest or require you to install an installer or a download manager before allowing you to download a program you may be interested in downloading. These tools almost always cause your computer more problems and may even have malware or other spyware. Avoid any site claiming anything must be installed first before you can continue with your download.

9. Avoid advertisements on download pages

To help make money and pay for the bandwidth costs of supplying free the software, the final download page may have ads. Watch out for anything that looks like advertisements on the download page. Many advertisers try to trick viewers into clicking an ad with phrases like “Download Now”, “Start Download”, or “Continue” and that ad may open a separate download.

Cancel or deny any automatic download

Some sites may automatically try start a download or give the appearance that something needs to be installed or updated before the site or video can be seen. Never accept or install anything from any site unless you know what is downloading.
Not keeping operating system and software up-to-date

The evolution of computers and the software that computer’s use is always evolving. After a program is released bugs and security threats are almost always discovered by other users. Installing the latest updates for a program makes sure everything runs smooth and if security fixes are found fix those problems, so your data is kept secure.

10. Keep a computer on a surge protector or UPS

If you plug your desktop computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone into a wall outlet consider using a surge protector instead. A surge protector can help keep your computer protected during an electrical storm and make sure that nothing is damaged if a surge travels over your power lines.

Also, if you are using a desktop computer we highly recommend also using a UPS on your computer. Although these can be more expensive, a UPS protects your computer from a surge, brown out, and keeps the computer running if the power goes out for a minute or two.
Buying incompatible hardware or peripherals

Computers are becoming more diversified with Chrome books, hybrid computers, laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Although all of these devices are considered computers, not all hardware is compatible with every type of computer. Also, this is true with Apple computers vs. PC computers, and PC computers running Windows or Linux, which are all running different operating systems.

Before purchasing hardware or upgrading older hardware make sure its compatible with your computer, operating system, and meets the system requirements.

This post was found at: http://www.computerhope.com/tips/tip220.htm

Microsoft accused of Windows 10 upgrade ‘nasty trick’

I can personally relate to this.  I have been receiving several phone calls to my computer repair business every week from customers who went to bed and woke up and there computer had upgraded itself to Windows 10.  I really enjoyed this article and thought many of you may be able to relate to it as well.

Windows 10 update

Microsoft has faced criticism for changing the pop-up box encouraging Windows users to upgrade to Windows 10.

Clicking the cross in the top-right hand corner of the pop-up box now agrees to a scheduled upgrade rather than rejecting it.

This has caused confusion as clicking the cross typically closes a pop-up notification.

The upgrade could still be cancelled when the scheduled time for it to begin appeared, Microsoft said.

The change occurred because the update is now labelled “recommended” and many people have their PCs configured to accept recommended updates for security reasons.

This means dismissing the box does not dismiss the update.

Brad Chacos, senior editor at the PC World website, described it as a “nasty trick”.

“Deploying these dirty tricks only frustrates long-time Windows users who have very valid reasons to stick with operating systems they already know and love,” he wrote.

Microsoft said: “With the free Windows 10 upgrade offer ending on 29 July, we want to help people upgrade to the best version of Windows.

“As we shared in October, Windows 10 will be offered as a ‘recommended’ update for Windows 7 and 8.1 customers whose Windows Update settings are configured to accept ‘recommended’ updates.

“Customers can choose to accept or decline the Windows 10 upgrade.”

Story found on: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36367221